Dear Teacher…

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To My Child’s Teacher:

I wanted to make you aware of something you may not have considered in regards to these “Where I Came From” type of assignments. My daughter does not have a birth picture as most international adoptees do not. This can be very painful to some adoptees when class assignments such as this come around. My daughter was born in Korea where children are adopted in a very legal and orderly manner with children being placed with agencies after birth. Yet, part of her past is missing. And some kids from China are left in public places as it is against the law for parents to abandon a child and in that culture the gender of choice is male. Therefore, often girls are abandoned. In addition, due to the one child policy; abandonment happens to females in high numbers. These children often struggle with the fact that they were “left” somewhere.

In addition, having to include a story of their birth is very difficult because many children who are adopted have no clue about the story of their birth. They can’t say things like my mother ate pickles during pregnancy and cried and cried when I was born. They have no idea of the circumstances of their birth except that in many countires it is one of disgrace and shame. Instead of their birth being a happy time many adoptees feel that it is a time of sorrow where they lost their identity and their heritage.

My daughter cannot answer the questions of the hospital where she was born and who came to see her and how her mother felt. We can answer those questions from when we first saw her picture at three months and when she came home at almost 8 months but this seperates her out from the other kids. In addition, we only encourage her to share what she knows of her birth story with people she wants to and frankly it is not appropriate for just anyone to know nor it is not everyone’s business to know the circumstances of her birth.

These kinds of assignments can be hurtful to adoptees or children who come from “different” families other than a two parent mom and dad type of family. Many kids now come from gay families and may not be comfortable sharing that. Many kids now come from single mother with unknown fathers and may not be comfortable sharing that. Many children come from foster families and had abusive first parents who may have told them over and over things like, “I wish you had not been born.” Many times the birth of a child is not a “happy” time in a family and a child may know that. While the jist of these assignments are made with the noblest of intentions, in reality, these types of assignments are often uncomfortable and hurtful for children.

Just wanted you to consider this from another point of view.

To My Child’s Teacher-The Hurt In Family Tree Assignments

To My Child’s Teacher:

I wanted to make you aware of something you may not have considered in regards to these “Where I Came From/Family Tree” type of assignments. My daughter does not have a birth picture as most international adoptees do not. This can be very painful to some adoptees when class assignments such as this come around. My daughter was born in Korea where children are adopted in a very legal and orderly manner with children being placed with agencies after birth. Yet, part of her past is missing. And some kids from China are left in public places as it is against the law for parents to abandon a child and in that culture the gender of choice is male. Therefore, often girls are abandoned. In addition, due to the one child policy; abandonment happens to females in high numbers. These children often struggle with the fact that they were “left” somewhere.

In addition, having to include a story of their birth is very difficult because many children who are adopted have no clue about the story of their birth. They can’t say things like my mother ate pickles during pregnancy and cried and cried when I was born. They have no idea of the circumstances of their birth except that in many countires it is one of disgrace and shame. Instead of their birth being a happy time many adoptees feel that it is a time of sorrow where they lost their identity and their heritage.

My daughter cannot answer the questions of the hospital where she was born and who came to see her and how her mother felt. We can answer those questions from when we first saw her picture at three months and when she came home at almost 8 months but this seperates her out from the other kids. In addition, we only encourage her to share what she knows of her birth story with people she wants to and frankly it is not appropriate for just anyone to know nor it is not everyone’s business to know the circumstances of her birth.

These kinds of assignments can be hurtful to adoptees or children who come from “different” families other than a two parent mom and dad type of family. Many kids now come from gay families and may not be comfortable sharing that. Many kids now come from single mother with unknown fathers and may not be comfortable sharing that. Many children come from foster families and had abusive first parents who may have told them over and over things like, “I wish you had not been born.” Many times the birth of a child is not a “happy” time in a family and a child may know that. While the jist of these assignments are made with the noblest of intentions, in reality, these types of assignments are often uncomfortable and hurtful for children not just because they single them out but because their past is full of loss and pain.

Just wanted you to consider this from another point of view.

Minimum Days

images-14Too Bad My Kids Don’t

All across my school district

I hear the mothers sigh

Another minimum day for the kids

Oh why…oh why… oh why?

If they are forced to wake them up

Before the birds do fly

Surely the district can keep them there

Until the afternoon arrives

But no you will bring your kids

For half a day at best

Then you will turn around and fetch them

While your house remains a mess

The usually quite afternoon

Becomes quite the verbal brawl

As kids run and out of the house

Poor mom, the referee of all

And so I would curse the district

This idea put into place

But I’m too tired and weary

As I run back and forth in haste

Who I Really Want To Yell At…Upcoming IEP…Shoot Me Now

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So we have an IEP coming up. Any parent who has ever participated in an IEP meeting knows the special kind of hell that is reserved just for us.  It is a game for adults while the pawns are the kids. These are children whose lives can be changed for a lifetime if they only get the help that they so desperately need. Parents wrangle to get what their children are entitled to under the law while school districts try to keep their budgets in line or just disagree for purely reasons of precedence. And with an unfunded federal mandate to provide these services to those in need…well, it truly is a no win situation except in the simplest of cases.

This time when I walk into that room with principals, teachers, school district big-wigs, and lawyers I want to say something meaningful, poignant and straight to the heart. What I want to say is this:

“Every year parents of special needs children divorce. In fact, according to statistics provided by various sources it is estimated that 80-90% of couples whose children are considered special needs divorce; thereby disrupting the most vulnerable of families. These are families in need of two adults in a household to co-parent and provide support to one another while they manage hour-long tantrums, disruptive behaviors, and the close supervision that is often required of children with autism and other neurological conditions. Divorce is ugly. It changes the hearts of both children and adults. It makes kids feel unsafe and unsure about their future.

So why am I telling you this?

Unfortunately, our family may soon become one of these statistics. Although we are fighting to stay together I don’t know if we will win this battle. It is ironic because we have stayed together for 29 years with ABA therapists in our home 5 days a week. We have made it through home safety issues, seizures, special diets and numerous calls from the school. And we are tired. Worn out. And haven’t had time for one another for so long.

So what does this have to do with you and how can you help?

Do what is right by our children. Honor our requests instead of just setting them aside and ignoring them. We know our kids and often we know exactly what they need. Think in terms of the far off future and outcomes that will ensure that my child will one day be a tax paying American instead of someone who needs assistance their entire life.  Provide those things you would expect for your own children or grandchildren. Think beyond and outside of the box. Do what is moral, courageous and honorable. And do it now. Stop being intentionally adversarial and work from the belief that if we cooperate, children with special needs can and will reach their full potential; thereby benefitting this community and nation.

Finally, I am letting you know that while I do not blame you for our marital issues, I do want you to be mindful that the constant extra challenges such as IEP meetings add extra layers of stress on top a marriage that can cause it to eventually sink. Remember these IEP meetings are not a game and our family is not something to be manipulated and discarded without regard. We are people trying to do our best in situations that most of you cannot truly comprehend.

In conclusion I ask you to take to heart the words of James Rachel who said:

“Principles of justice are principles that rational, self-interested people would choose to govern the society in which they were going to live, provided that they did not know, at the time they chose the principles, exactly what their own place in society would be” “– James Rachel’s forward  to John Rawl’s  book, Two Concepts of Rules.